Young woman siting at cafe drinking coffee and working on laptopWith 450 million users around the world as of summer 2016, LinkedIn is the largest professional social media site that exists. If you are a working professional or aspiring to become one, you need to be on LinkedIn. It’s that simple.

While there are additional professional networking sites you could join, start with getting on LinkedIn. If you’re not, you’re missing out on making valuable career connections, finding potential clients, being seen by recruiters looking for talent, and more. However, throwing together a profile and occasionally logging on is not enough. There is some basic LinkedIn etiquette that you need to be aware of and follow or you’re likely to sabotage yourself. Here are the areas where it’s especially important to follow the unwritten do’s and don’ts of LinkedIn.

Your profile picture…

1. DO make sure your profile has a professional looking photo of you. Think about what you would want to look like if you were about to interview for your dream job, that’s the impression you want to make with the headshot you select. You want to look like someone a hiring manager could see working for them.

DON’T be wearing a hat, sunglasses, or anything else that hides your face in the photo. This photo shouldn’t be a glamor shot or a picture of you in a bathing suit. It should be a picture you took specifically for this purpose, not a regular photo that you cropped around your head. Remember the kind of attention you are trying to attract.

Your profile information…

2. DO update your profile regularly. Make sure you turn off notifications when making major changes to your LinkedIn profile – you don’t want to annoy your contacts by popping up in their feed five times in one day because you made a lot of profile changes. This could lead to people removing you as a connection.

DON’T lie or exaggerate on your LinkedIn profile. Be honest about who you are, where you’ve worked, and what your accomplishments are. Remember that coworkers and colleagues will see your profile. Falsely inflating your profile will destroy your credibility.

3. DO connect the email addresses you use, both for work and personal communications, to LinkedIn. That way you will be automatically notified when your contacts join LinkedIn so you can connect with them.

DON’T list an unprofessional sounding email address on your profile as the way to contact you – no recruiter is going to contact beachbodyhottie7@hotmail.com for an interview.

Recommendations and endorsements…

4. DO offer to write recommendations and endorse people’s skills. But only if you can speak confidently about that person’s abilities from first-hand experience.

DON’T ask people you don’t know for endorsements and recommendations – even if they would be willing to write one for you, such a recommendation is meaningless.

Connecting with strangers…

5. DO be willing to talk to strangers– you will get invitations to connect and messages from people you don’t know, as long as their intentions appear genuine, don’t hesitate to respond.

DON’T send out tons of invitations to connect to whoever you feel like – this isn’t Facebook and you should only be connecting with people you know or have a legitimate reason for wanting to connect with.

6. DO ask for introductions to 2nd-degree connections, but think before you ask, and try to only ask when the introduction could be mutually beneficial.

DON’T send people you don’t know who visit your profile a message saying, “Hey, I saw you checked out my profile!” If they want to connect or message you they will. It’s acceptable to view their profile back and message them if there is a mutually beneficial reason to connect.

Communicating…

7. DO respond to messages and comments in a timely manner – it’s common courtesy!

DON’T slam others or post negative comments in groups – politely offering a different opinion is okay, but putting down others is not going to build your reputation on LinkedIn, it will only hurt it.

8. DO send personalized invitations to connect instead of the canned messages LinkedIn provides– be honest about why you want to connect and give each person a reason to accept your request.

DON’T delay in adding new professional connections on LinkedIn – if you wait too long they might forget who you are. Adding someone on LinkedIn shows that you intend to stay in touch and makes it easy to maintain the relationship.

9. DO keep in contact with all your connections! LinkedIn makes it easy by notifying you when your connections have work anniversaries, update their profiles, or start new jobs. Write them to say congrats, endorse their new skill, or like their update. You want to stay fresh in the minds of your professional colleagues.

DON’T use LinkedIn to vent or share bad news with an individual or group of people.

Being active on LinkedIn…

10. DO make it a habit to check LinkedIn once a day and post, like, and share regularly – like all social media, if you’re not active, no one will notice you!

DON’T go overboard with posting updates and keep your posts professional – Most experts recommend posting once a day. Any more than that could get annoying to your connections. Remember that this is a professional networking site! You shouldn’t post about what you ate for dinner, what you did last weekend (unless it was something relevant to your career or charitable work), or share cute kitten videos.

11. DO post updates about your accomplishments, your company, and share news about your industry. This helps establish you as an expert in your field.

DON’T post or otherwise share internal information about your organization. Before you post, consider if the information is confidential and if sharing it shows the company is a positive light. If you’re not sure ask your boss or someone in HR first!

LinkedIn can be a powerful tool for you, whether you are seeking a new job, trying to find new clients, or simply want to grow in your career. But you have to understand the purpose of professional networking sites and use proper LinkedIn etiquette. A simple rule of thumb to remember is that if you wouldn’t say it, share it, or look at it at work, you probably shouldn’t do it on LinkedIn.

Try to check your ego before logging on, don’t be so bold as to think that people care what you have to say in your status updates. People are on LinkedIn for a purpose, most of the time they have a problem they are trying to solve. You build your online reputation and network by providing others value and establishing mutually beneficial relationships. If you haven’t already, sign up with LinkedIn today and start making career connections!

Young woman siting at cafe drinking coffee and working on laptopWith 450 million users around the world as of summer 2016, LinkedIn is the largest professional social media site that exists. If you are a working professional or aspiring to become one, you need to be on LinkedIn. It’s that simple.

While there are additional professional networking sites you could join, start with getting on LinkedIn. If you’re not, you’re missing out on making valuable career connections, finding potential clients, being seen by recruiters looking for talent, and more. However, throwing together a profile and occasionally logging on is not enough. There is some basic LinkedIn etiquette that you need to be aware of and follow or you’re likely to sabotage yourself. Here are the areas where it’s especially important to follow the unwritten do’s and don’ts of LinkedIn.

Your profile picture…

1. DO make sure your profile has a professional looking photo of you. Think about what you would want to look like if you were about to interview for your dream job, that’s the impression you want to make with the headshot you select. You want to look like someone a hiring manager could see working for them.

DON’T be wearing a hat, sunglasses, or anything else that hides your face in the photo. This photo shouldn’t be a glamor shot or a picture of you in a bathing suit. It should be a picture you took specifically for this purpose, not a regular photo that you cropped around your head. Remember the kind of attention you are trying to attract.

Your profile information…

2. DO update your profile regularly. Make sure you turn off notifications when making major changes to your LinkedIn profile – you don’t want to annoy your contacts by popping up in their feed five times in one day because you made a lot of profile changes. This could lead to people removing you as a connection.

DON’T lie or exaggerate on your LinkedIn profile. Be honest about who you are, where you’ve worked, and what your accomplishments are. Remember that coworkers and colleagues will see your profile. Falsely inflating your profile will destroy your credibility.

3. DO connect the email addresses you use, both for work and personal communications, to LinkedIn. That way you will be automatically notified when your contacts join LinkedIn so you can connect with them.

DON’T list an unprofessional sounding email address on your profile as the way to contact you – no recruiter is going to contact beachbodyhottie7@hotmail.com for an interview.

Recommendations and endorsements…

4. DO offer to write recommendations and endorse people’s skills. But only if you can speak confidently about that person’s abilities from first-hand experience.

DON’T ask people you don’t know for endorsements and recommendations – even if they would be willing to write one for you, such a recommendation is meaningless.

Connecting with strangers…

5. DO be willing to talk to strangers– you will get invitations to connect and messages from people you don’t know, as long as their intentions appear genuine, don’t hesitate to respond.

DON’T send out tons of invitations to connect to whoever you feel like – this isn’t Facebook and you should only be connecting with people you know or have a legitimate reason for wanting to connect with.

6. DO ask for introductions to 2nd-degree connections, but think before you ask, and try to only ask when the introduction could be mutually beneficial.

DON’T send people you don’t know who visit your profile a message saying, “Hey, I saw you checked out my profile!” If they want to connect or message you they will. It’s acceptable to view their profile back and message them if there is a mutually beneficial reason to connect.

Communicating…

7. DO respond to messages and comments in a timely manner – it’s common courtesy!

DON’T slam others or post negative comments in groups – politely offering a different opinion is okay, but putting down others is not going to build your reputation on LinkedIn, it will only hurt it.

8. DO send personalized invitations to connect instead of the canned messages LinkedIn provides– be honest about why you want to connect and give each person a reason to accept your request.

DON’T delay in adding new professional connections on LinkedIn – if you wait too long they might forget who you are. Adding someone on LinkedIn shows that you intend to stay in touch and makes it easy to maintain the relationship.

9. DO keep in contact with all your connections! LinkedIn makes it easy by notifying you when your connections have work anniversaries, update their profiles, or start new jobs. Write them to say congrats, endorse their new skill, or like their update. You want to stay fresh in the minds of your professional colleagues.

DON’T use LinkedIn to vent or share bad news with an individual or group of people.

Being active on LinkedIn…

10. DO make it a habit to check LinkedIn once a day and post, like, and share regularly – like all social media, if you’re not active, no one will notice you!

DON’T go overboard with posting updates and keep your posts professional – Most experts recommend posting once a day. Any more than that could get annoying to your connections. Remember that this is a professional networking site! You shouldn’t post about what you ate for dinner, what you did last weekend (unless it was something relevant to your career or charitable work), or share cute kitten videos.

11. DO post updates about your accomplishments, your company, and share news about your industry. This helps establish you as an expert in your field.

DON’T post or otherwise share internal information about your organization. Before you post, consider if the information is confidential and if sharing it shows the company is a positive light. If you’re not sure ask your boss or someone in HR first!

LinkedIn can be a powerful tool for you, whether you are seeking a new job, trying to find new clients, or simply want to grow in your career. But you have to understand the purpose of professional networking sites and use proper LinkedIn etiquette. A simple rule of thumb to remember is that if you wouldn’t say it, share it, or look at it at work, you probably shouldn’t do it on LinkedIn.

Try to check your ego before logging on, don’t be so bold as to think that people care what you have to say in your status updates. People are on LinkedIn for a purpose, most of the time they have a problem they are trying to solve. You build your online reputation and network by providing others value and establishing mutually beneficial relationships. If you haven’t already, sign up with LinkedIn today and start making career connections!

error: Alert: Content is protected !!