Blackboard It's Halloween Be Safe! Flashlight Calendar white backgroundIt’s that time of year, the leaves are turning, apple cider is flowing, the temperature is dropping and everyone’s planning their costumes in anticipation for one of fall’s most anticipated holidays: Halloween! As a senior citizen, you’ve probably celebrated many Halloweens with your family and done your fair share of trick-or-treating, as a kid or parent. Regardless of whether or not you’ll be strolling the neighborhood with your grandkids or will be staying home to hand out candy, you’ll want to check out our tips for how to have a safe and Happy Halloween!

1. Avoid driving (if possible) during peak Trick-or-Treat hours

Traditionally, children who participate in trick-or-treating are accompanied by their friends and family in their local neighborhoods, decked from head to toe in elaborate costumes with their candy buckets in tow. Like many people, whether it’s Halloween or not, you probably have some errands to run or things to do that require you to leave the house. In the interest of safety for fellow trick-or-treaters and yourself, it would be best to get all your errands out of the way before the sun goes down. As brightly colored and interesting as costumes can be, it can be difficult to spot families as the sky is darkening (especially if your eyesight is deteriorating), and more challenging to notice small children who might stray from a sidewalk and into the path of oncoming cars. If you must drive at night, be sure to remain hyper aware of the holiday and drive as slowly as possible so everyone can experience a safe Halloween!

2. Stay inside the doorway of your home when trick-or-treaters come knocking

If you’re a little apprehensive about total strangers knocking on your door and asking for candy at night, it’s understandable even given the holiday! Whether the trick-or-treaters are 6′ teenagers or two parents with a small child, never feel obligated to let anyone into your home. With informal traditions such as Mischief Night and trick-or-treaters who opt for terrifying masks, it’s normal to want to be cautious when answering the door. Make sure that before answering the door you look out your peephole or window – if whoever is knocking makes you uncomfortable, you’re not obligated to open it no matter what day it is!

3. Keep the lights on inside and outside of your home

Whether you choose to hand out candy on Halloween night or hit the hay early, it’s still a good idea to keep your interior and exterior lights on.

Why?

While a dark house may deter hopeful candy collectors, it may inadvertently attract vandals who may think you’re not at home. Keeping the lights on will not only allow you to be able to clearly see who’s on your doorstep, it’ll also signal to the families who are trick-or-treating that you’re at home to hand out the goodies (if you want to hand out candy), and it will keep anyone up to no good from assuming you’ve stepped out (even if you have). If you can’t be at home to hand out candy, it’s common practice to leave a bowl outside your doorstep for trick-or-treaters to dig into – the kids will be very thankful you did so even though you may not be there to give it to them personally. It may also be in your best interest to have a friend or family member come over if you live alone and don’t feel comfortable opening the door.

4. Ditch the spare change, raisins, or oatmeal packets and hand out the “good stuff”

In the interest of saving parents a trip to the dentist, you may feel compelled to hand out something less sugary or altogether much healthier than candy, especially if you’ve forgotten to swing by the store and grab a bag. While your heart is in the right place and many parents may find it amusing if their child gets a toothbrush or a quarter for having the courage to knock on a stranger’s door, most kids will be crestfallen to receive something drastically different from what they were expecting (chocolate, lip puckering sour candies, lollipops etc). If you feel strongly about not passing out sweets, you can also opt for fun packs filled with little Halloween party favors or glow-in-the-dark sticks.

If you want repeat trick-or-treaters next year, it’s probably best to go with name brand candies that kids will recognize and enjoy. Not sure what the kids like these days? Check out this list of the 27 Best Candy Halloween Variety Packs! Variety packs offer a great assortment of name brand candies so you can spend less time deciding on what candy you should buy, and more time admiring the kids’ costumes!

5. Watch for candy that appears to have been opened or tampered with

If you live with your grandkids or plan to spend the holiday with them, you should keep a vigilant eye on what the kids dump out of their candy buckets. Most adults check all candy before allowing their children to consume any of it, and in 2016 it’s no different from any other year. Although Halloween is usually a light-hearted and fun affair, it’s important to be aware that there are people in the world who may not have the interests of the innocent in mind. Taking the time to make sure that they won’t be eating anything that could land them in the ER is important to having a safe Halloween.

Get more news and tips from AmeriLife

Blackboard It's Halloween Be Safe! Flashlight Calendar white backgroundIt’s that time of year, the leaves are turning, apple cider is flowing, the temperature is dropping and everyone’s planning their costumes in anticipation for one of fall’s most anticipated holidays: Halloween! As a senior citizen, you’ve probably celebrated many Halloweens with your family and done your fair share of trick-or-treating, as a kid or parent. Regardless of whether or not you’ll be strolling the neighborhood with your grandkids or will be staying home to hand out candy, you’ll want to check out our tips for how to have a safe and Happy Halloween!

1. Avoid driving (if possible) during peak Trick-or-Treat hours

Traditionally, children who participate in trick-or-treating are accompanied by their friends and family in their local neighborhoods, decked from head to toe in elaborate costumes with their candy buckets in tow. Like many people, whether it’s Halloween or not, you probably have some errands to run or things to do that require you to leave the house. In the interest of safety for fellow trick-or-treaters and yourself, it would be best to get all your errands out of the way before the sun goes down. As brightly colored and interesting as costumes can be, it can be difficult to spot families as the sky is darkening (especially if your eyesight is deteriorating), and more challenging to notice small children who might stray from a sidewalk and into the path of oncoming cars. If you must drive at night, be sure to remain hyper aware of the holiday and drive as slowly as possible so everyone can experience a safe Halloween!

2. Stay inside the doorway of your home when trick-or-treaters come knocking

If you’re a little apprehensive about total strangers knocking on your door and asking for candy at night, it’s understandable even given the holiday! Whether the trick-or-treaters are 6′ teenagers or two parents with a small child, never feel obligated to let anyone into your home. With informal traditions such as Mischief Night and trick-or-treaters who opt for terrifying masks, it’s normal to want to be cautious when answering the door. Make sure that before answering the door you look out your peephole or window – if whoever is knocking makes you uncomfortable, you’re not obligated to open it no matter what day it is!

3. Keep the lights on inside and outside of your home

Whether you choose to hand out candy on Halloween night or hit the hay early, it’s still a good idea to keep your interior and exterior lights on.

Why?

While a dark house may deter hopeful candy collectors, it may inadvertently attract vandals who may think you’re not at home. Keeping the lights on will not only allow you to be able to clearly see who’s on your doorstep, it’ll also signal to the families who are trick-or-treating that you’re at home to hand out the goodies (if you want to hand out candy), and it will keep anyone up to no good from assuming you’ve stepped out (even if you have). If you can’t be at home to hand out candy, it’s common practice to leave a bowl outside your doorstep for trick-or-treaters to dig into – the kids will be very thankful you did so even though you may not be there to give it to them personally. It may also be in your best interest to have a friend or family member come over if you live alone and don’t feel comfortable opening the door.

4. Ditch the spare change, raisins, or oatmeal packets and hand out the “good stuff”

In the interest of saving parents a trip to the dentist, you may feel compelled to hand out something less sugary or altogether much healthier than candy, especially if you’ve forgotten to swing by the store and grab a bag. While your heart is in the right place and many parents may find it amusing if their child gets a toothbrush or a quarter for having the courage to knock on a stranger’s door, most kids will be crestfallen to receive something drastically different from what they were expecting (chocolate, lip puckering sour candies, lollipops etc). If you feel strongly about not passing out sweets, you can also opt for fun packs filled with little Halloween party favors or glow-in-the-dark sticks.

If you want repeat trick-or-treaters next year, it’s probably best to go with name brand candies that kids will recognize and enjoy. Not sure what the kids like these days? Check out this list of the 27 Best Candy Halloween Variety Packs! Variety packs offer a great assortment of name brand candies so you can spend less time deciding on what candy you should buy, and more time admiring the kids’ costumes!

5. Watch for candy that appears to have been opened or tampered with

If you live with your grandkids or plan to spend the holiday with them, you should keep a vigilant eye on what the kids dump out of their candy buckets. Most adults check all candy before allowing their children to consume any of it, and in 2016 it’s no different from any other year. Although Halloween is usually a light-hearted and fun affair, it’s important to be aware that there are people in the world who may not have the interests of the innocent in mind. Taking the time to make sure that they won’t be eating anything that could land them in the ER is important to having a safe Halloween.

Get more news and tips from AmeriLife

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